ISBN: 978-1-899253-31-9

Choral singing, wellbeing and health: Summary of findings from a cross-national survey


Author(s):*Listed Alphabetically
Clift S, Hancox G, Hess B, Kreutz G, Morrison I, Stewart D

Year of Publication:
2008

Publisher(s):
Canterbury Christ Church University

Publication Type:
Report

Abstract:

Report on a large-scale, cross-national study regarding the perceived benefits of choral singing.

Over 1000 choral singers from England (633), Germany (325) and Australia (166) responded to open questions on singing and quality of life, wellbeing and health. The report found that: choral singers tend to be well-educated; have a long-term interest in singing; many are in retirement and a majority are female. Many find singing as beneficial for wellbeing, especially women, however, around 10% may be coping with mental health issues. Singing can be a resource in later life, but foundations earlier in life are crucial for engagement in community singing. The study provides evidence to support more investment by local authorities and the NHS in

community music and singing provision to promote wellbeing and health, especially from midlife onwards.



Evidence Type: Survey

Main Focus: Wellbeing / Quality of life

Research Purpose: Survey

Context: Community

Art Forms: Music

Access Type: Free Download

APA Citation:

Clift, S., Hancox, G., Morrison, I., Hess, B., Stewart, D., & Kreutz, G. (2008). Choral singing, wellbeing and health: Summary of findings from a cross-national survey. Canterbury: Canterbury Christ Church University.