A review of the evidence assessing impact of social prescribing on healthcare demand and cost implications

A review of the evidence assessing impact of social prescribing on healthcare demand and cost implications


Author(s):*Listed Alphabetically
Bertotti M, Kimberlee R, Pilkington K, Polley M

Year of Publication:
2017

Publisher(s):
University of Westminster

Publication Type:
Report

Abstract:

A systematic search for papers was conducted on major online databases and further evaluations were assimilated from key opinion leaders. The criteria for inclusion were to: a) be UK-based, b) describe a social prescribing service that involved referral of a patient from primary care to a ‘link worker’ who would connect the patient with relevant non-medical interventions in the third sector and c) report either i) quantitative data on demand for healthcare services and/or ii) evaluation of social and economic impact of social prescribing.

Conclusions: the evidence for social prescribing is broadly supportive of its potential to reduce demand on primary and secondary care. The quality of that evidence is weak, however, and without further evaluation, it would be premature to conclude that a proof of concept for demand reduction had been established. Similarly, the evidence that social prescribing delivers cost savings to the health service over and above operating costs is encouraging but by no means proven or fully quantified.



Research Purpose: Literature Review

Access Type: Free Download

APA Citation:

Polley, M., Bertotti, M., Kimberlee, R., Pilkington, K. (2017). A review of the evidence assessing impact of social prescribing on healthcare demand and cost implications Technical Report. UK:University of Westminster.