Bigger’s not better, but it’s just as important: making the case for large-scale professional production within the applied theatre sector


Author(s):*Listed Alphabetically
Thornton S

Year of Publication:
2010

Publisher(s):
Collective Encounters

Publication Type:
Report

Abstract:

In 2003 the only thing anyone in north Liverpool was talking about was regeneration and how it was affecting local people. This report explains how Collective Encounters was established to give a voice to communities of North Liverpool that had been ignored and neglected for years. Living Place Project was the company’s first initiative and over the next two years Collective Encounters raised £150,000 to fund the project; employed 54 arts professionals, involved 60 degree students and engaged more than 500 local people in a creative research process.

They undertook desk research into regeneration and met with senior staff from all the agencies responsible for the regeneration of the city, but the centre piece of the project was a large-scale performance which articulated their research.

Living Place Project demonstrated a real need for on-going provision in north Liverpool, and Collective Encounters subsequently secured funding to become a full-time company. At the heart of Collective Encounters’ work is the aim to produce new work for new audiences in new spaces, which tackles pressing social and political concern.



Evidence Type: Qualitative Research

Main Focus: Wellbeing / Quality of life

Research Purpose: Discussion / Debate

Context: Community

Art Forms: Drama

Access Type: Free Download

APA Citation:

Thornton S. (2010). Bigger’s not better, but it’s just as important: making the case for large-scale professional production within the applied theatre sector. Liverpool: Collective Encounters.