Evaluation of ‘imove’, Yorkshire & Humber’s Legacy Trust UK Regional programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games


Author(s):*Listed Alphabetically
Froggett L, Hacking S, Manley J, Roy A

Year of Publication:
2013

Publisher(s):
Psychosocial Research Unit University of Central Lancashire

Publication Type:
Report

Abstract:

Imove was Yorkshire & Humberside’s Legacy Trust UK programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Formally launched to the public in 2010, imove’s programme included performing and visual arts, creative movement, sport and outdoor activity.

This report covers the programme as a whole and aims to:
• assess the impact of the programme against three specified strategic aims and seven legacy areas
• conduct an evaluation of the programme in terms of process and outcome
• document and assess the effect of creative movement-based activities in transcending boundaries between sport and culture

Using a mixed methodology, this report evaluates the effect of imove’s programme on individuals and communities in the region. It examines a cross-section of imove projects commissioned in Yorkshire and Humberside during the evaluation period, together with case studies of three curated projects and one large contracted strand. It also considers the importance of imove’s underlying concept; its co-producer model; its evolving organisational structure; relationships with external partners and other stakeholders; branding, public relations and marketing; the range and artistic quality of its outputs; its support for artists; and the participation, engagement and diversity of members of the public in imove’s events.



Evidence Type: Qualitative Research

Main Focus: Wellbeing / Quality of life

Research Purpose: Outcome Evaluation

Context: Community

Art Forms: Multi-Arts

Access Type: Free Download

APA Citation:

Froggett L., Manley J., Roy A., Hacking S. (2013) Evaluation of ‘imove’, Yorkshire & Humber’s Legacy Trust UK Regional programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. UK: University of Central Lancashire, Psychosocial Research Unit